Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

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Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby entireit » Thu Oct 13, 2011 12:52 pm

My fathers uncle was a member of the Worcestershire regiment 10th Battalion & died on the 3rd July 1916 he is buried at OVILLERS Military Cemetery France and I was wondering if there is anybody out there who can provide me with anymore information regarding that day or any information other than what I have written above.

Thank you in advance for any information
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Re: Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby scully » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:58 pm

Hi,

Further to your photo submissions I have added the details in the Roll of Honour section also including the following information.

The storming of the village of La Boisselle

Shortly after 3 a.m. on the 3rd July 1916 the 10th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment amid the blazing gun-fire all around, a warning order was passed along the line. A few minutes later a second order, unheard amidst the din but quickly sensed, rippled down the ranks. The men rose to their feet, and the order was given to advance. The platoons rushed forward, crossed "No Man's Land" and charged the German defences. A fierce fight followed with bomb and bayonet over successive lines of trenches. The companies became confused, control became impossible and the platoons stormed forward as best they could, led by their subalterns and N.C.O's. One party was led by Lance-Corporal A. J. Gardner, who dashed ahead of the rest carrying a Lewis-gun under his arm which he fired as he ran. A party of the enemy gave way before him and he seized their trench. He was hit, but continued to fire his Lewis-gun till he fainted from loss of blood. In small groups the Worcestershire platoons fought their way onwards into the ruins of the village. Ten days of intense bombardment had shattered every house; but the enemy had previously constructed deep dugouts and had strengthened the cellars. In those underground strongholds they had survived the bombardment, and now they swarmed up from their cover to meet the attack. In and around the smashed heaps of masonry which had once been houses, the British platoons fought with enemies who appeared suddenly and unexpectedly from every side. Only by the momentary light of flares and shell-bursts was it possible to distinguish friend from foe. The fighting was hand-to-hand or at point-blank range, with bomb, bullet or cold steel. At various points individual officers established some sort of order for a moment and attempted a systematic destruction of the German defences. Explosive charges previously prepared were brought up and were thrown down such dugouts as were discovered. But the fighting was too involved and the casualties too rapid for any permanent control.

Battalion Headquarters of the 10th Worcestershire had followed the companies forward across the trenches. The Commanding Officer, Colonel Royston-Piggott, made his way forward with his Adjutant up to a large mine-crater—the crater of the mine which had been fired on 1st July. There he made certain that his Battalion had reached the village. He dictated to his Adjutant a message to be sent back to Brigade reporting the progress. Just as the message was finished, the Colonel was shot through the heart. A few minutes later the Adjutant also was hit and, for a time, Battalion Headquarters ceased to exercise control.

The first light of dawn enabled the fighters in the village to recognise each other with certainty, and the struggle reached its climax. Most of the defenders had by that time been killed or captured, although a few strong points still held out. Several of the Worcestershire platoons had fought their way right through the village to the more open ground on the far side. That ground was a tangle of broken hedges in a wilderness of shell-holes. Small parties of troops pushed forward in the excitement of victory, shooting, bombing and collecting prisoners.

Regards,

Louis (webmaster)
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Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby entireit » Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:42 pm

AllanP, I know I have already posted this to you Allen but it was under the wrong entry in the forum. Did you manage to find out the entry in the Worcestershire Herald NewsPaper for me? Or could you point me at the location where I can source it myself if you are busy?
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Re: Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby John(txic) » Tue Dec 06, 2011 6:29 pm

Entireit,


You may be interested to learn that your Gt. Uncle's name appears on Dudley's War Memorial, located in the centre of the town.

I am researching the men commemorated on Dudley's war memorial, and have little information on L/Cpl Dunn: what was his address?
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Re: Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby jimdunn » Sat Dec 24, 2011 4:51 pm

John(txic) wrote:
> Entireit,
>
>
> You may be interested to learn that your Gt. Uncle's name appears on
> Dudley's War Memorial, located in the centre of the town.
>
> I am researching the men commemorated on Dudley's war memorial, and have
> little information on L/Cpl Dunn: what was his address?


dear john my uncle thomas dunn being the brother of my farther samuel dunn was born in netherton dudley in 1896 the family then moved to 4 greystone passage dudley he joined the army with four of his dudley palls in december 1915 only one of them came back he was jim winfield one of the other palls was named hughes but i dont no who the others were i used to talk with mr winfield when i was a young lad but never thought about asking about my uncle tom hope this will help you regards jim dunn ihave been twice this year to visit his grave in ovillers military cemetary near albert france
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Re: Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby John(txic) » Sat Dec 24, 2011 8:20 pm

Thanks, Entireit: information like this helps bring these lads back to life.

The Hughes might have been 20578 Pte Edward Hughes; also of the 10th Worcesters, he died on the same day and I have him recorded as living at no. 36 Greystone Passage; in view of his number he must have been standing close to your Gt. Uncle at the recruiting station.

A 200104 Sgt. James Moss of the 1st/7th Worcesters lived at no. 1 Greystone Passage; he died on 13th April 1917.

Both of these men are remembered on Dudley's War Memorial, and may have been comrades of your Gt. Uncle.


Season's Greetings,


John


PS - I have found several instances of men with consecutive regimental numbers appearing on Dudley's War Memorial. In two cases I have found men who must have joined together (due to their consecutive numbers) and who died on the same day.
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Re: Lance CPL Thomas Dunn

Postby entireit » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:12 am

That would make sense as my father told me that when he enlisted he went with four of his friends from Dudley. I think it was the week after Christmas and I always wondered if they had got together for a drink over the Christmas period & while drinking and enjoying themselves and the conversation turning to the war that had just begun and one of them suggesting they all enlisted together it seeming a good idea at the time and how they would return as heroes, unaware of the horrors they would face and the realisation that they would not be 'home in no time' as they had once thought. Only one of the five pals returned home Jim Winfield.
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