Fighting in the Air booklet and A.S.W. Dore

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Fighting in the Air booklet and A.S.W. Dore

Postby markg » Sat Mar 10, 2012 12:32 pm

I have obtained a booklet called" fighting in the air" by Major L.W.B. Rees r.f.c.&ra..It is signed at the top by A.S.W. Dore in heavy black ink. I believe this booklet was issued in 1916 to R.A.F. fighter pilots. I have noticed a ASW Dore mentioned on this website and I was wondering if it is the same ASW Dore. The book is in good condition but, the back of the cover is missing. If anyone can help with any information I would be gratefull...thank you
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Re: Fighting in the Air booklet and A.S.W. Dore

Postby scully » Sat Mar 10, 2012 12:36 pm

Hi Mark,

Yes it would be Major Alan Sidney Whitehorn Dore, D.S.O. who was seconded for duty as an Observer with the Royal Flying Corps on the 24th March 1916. He was Appointed Flying Officer on the 3rd November 1916.

Regards,

Louis (webmaster)
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Re: Fighting in the Air booklet and A.S.W. Dore

Postby corona » Sat Mar 10, 2012 1:13 pm

Hi Mark,
If you GOOGLE Major A S W Dore ( WW2TALK Site) has a large amount of biographical information displayed on your man.
Regards,
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Re: Fighting in the Air booklet and A.S.W. Dore

Postby corona » Sat Mar 10, 2012 1:38 pm

Mark,
All of the biographical information on Major Dore is available on this site (research/Worc. RFC men)
My apologies to Louis, our super Webmaster ,for failing to look closer to home at his excellent site.
corona
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Re: Fighting in the Air booklet and A.S.W. Dore

Postby markg » Sun Mar 11, 2012 10:54 am

Thank you for the help and replies. I did not know if it was the right thing to do to join this forum as I have no military background and too young to have fought in the 1st or 2nd world wars. However, I am glad I did. I hope you chaps do not mind.
The little booklet now has a new meaning; not just a name. I have seen the photo of ASW Dore and read quite a bit about him. Holding the booklet I find touching now as I can just imagine ASW Dore holding it all those years ago. I wonder what he was thinking at the time.
I will just write the first few paragraphs of the booklet which I find fascinating-----The British pilot always likes the idea of fighting, and is self reliant. He is a quick thinker compared with the enemy, so that he has the advantage in manoeuvrings. He fights for the sport of the affair, if for no other reason. After the first engagement he gains great confidence from the Parthian tactics of the Enemy.. Very wisely, he is not hampered by strict rules, and as a rule is allowed to conduct his own affairs.
The Enemy Pilot, on the other hand, is of a gregarious nature form long national training and often seems to be bound strict rules, which cramp his style to a great extent. The enemy pilots are often uneducated men, being looked on as simply drivers of machines, while the gunner or observer is considered a grade higher than the pilot

Amazing stuff; the rest of the booklet goes on to describe tactics, where to aim, etc. Diagrams are given. One fact I found interesting that beyond 400 yards their bullets where considered useless.
Anyway, thank you gentlemen, I would like to stay a member if I may. Regards Mark Gaster
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