Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

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Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby Simon_Fielding » Mon Sep 25, 2006 9:34 pm

I have gathered a fair bit of material on the men of the regiment who are recorded on the Bewdley War Memorial, and I am always happy to share and swamp information.

I'm currently focusing on the Bewdley men of the 4th Bn and their service at Gallipoli.

I have a CD version of Stacke if anyone needs a look-up.

Cheers

Simon
Researching the 75 men of the Great War Memorial of St Anne's Church, Bewdley, Worcestershire .
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Men of Bewdley

Postby Mike Jones » Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:09 am

Hello Simon, I am struggling badly with this new system and not sure where this reply will end up but here goes. My main interest is regimental numbers from around the time of World War 1, their link to a date of enlistment and which battalion a man ended up in. Some bits are clear, other bits are very foggy but I am working hard to clear the fog. Maybe we can swop some information. I have 4 data-bases on the go, which may be of some help to you. What I would like, if you have it are details of wether a man was a Regular, Reservist or on the Special Reserve. Any details of when a man enlisted and/or any thing else you think might clear the fog a bit. Many thanks Mike Jones
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Pte Jabbitt 4th Btn Worcs. Regmnt. Dod 06.08.1915

Postby ajabbitt » Thu Oct 26, 2006 1:27 am

Hi Simon,

I have just stumbled across this fantastic website and discovered the fate of my great grandfather who died in the assault on Lone Pine, Gallipoili, 1915.

I have also just seen your message re 4th Btn and would love to know if you have any record of a Pte Jabbitt (number 20520)?

Many thanks in advance.

Regards,
Andrew
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby gallipolidigger » Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:13 am

hello simon,
I need anykind of information about lance corporal John GANLEY who died in 27 sept. 1915 suvla/gallipoli....
I appreciate any assistance ...thanx
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Postby hilsel » Fri Feb 23, 2007 11:06 am

Hello Simon, I hope you will receive this message, I am looking for any information on my Grandfather, Henry Mcdonald, who was with the 4th Bn, Worcestershire Regiment, Private no 21806, and died on 6 August, 1915 at Gallipoli. Regards Hilary
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Re:

Postby Simon_Fielding » Fri Apr 22, 2011 3:56 pm

hilsel wrote:
> Hello Simon, I hope you will receive this message, I am looking for any
> information on my Grandfather, Henry Mcdonald, who was with the 4th Bn,
> Worcestershire Regiment, Private no 21806, and died on 6 August, 1915 at
> Gallipoli. Regards Hilary

A bit from Stacke on the 6th Aug 1915


The action in which John Alberts met his death became known as the battle of Krithia Vineyard. This was a effort by the 88th brigade of the 29th division (including the 4th Worcesters) and the 127th brigade of the 42nd division to seize the tip of a well defended salient based on the hamlet of Krithia between Krithia Nullah and the Gully Ravine. 42nd div attack morning of 7th august full artillery fire to fall on positions south of the Nullah The wider importance of the action was to divert Turkish attention from the new allied offensive centred on the new landing site of Sulva bay to the northwest of the Gallipoli peninsula.

Out of 46000 on roll only muster 26000 rifles



tin plates to backs flashing in Turkish trenches - all dead





The 4th battalion had recently been reinforced by fresh drafts of troops (including Pte Alberts who entered the Dardanelles on the 4th July) to about 800 men. Under the command of Major Seton, they left the beach at 4.0 am on the morning of August 6th, and moved to the assembly trenches. The attack was scheduled to begin after the heaviest bombardment the expeditionary force could muster. The troops waited for the attack in the full force of the sun, and tried to observe the ground over which they were to attack. There was a slight ridge between the Turkish trenches and the British line, and the attack was to be made against a series of fortified positions, with strong Turkish positions flanking the Worcesters from left and right. Neutralizing them with artillery was vital. The bombardment, drawing on all the artillery available to VII Corps, and naval gunfire from a cruiser, five monitors and five destroyers. The shelling was watched by the VIII corps commander designate Lt Gen Davies and his staff from a hill above W beach. He later observed that the bombardment for this major attack was less than for a trench raid on the Western front.

The Turks replied with a savagely effective barrage of their own on the crowded British trenches, which were soon heavily damaged and choked with casualties. British guns renewed their barrages at 3.15pm, reaching a crescendo at 3.50pm, when the whistles sounded and the troops scrambled out of their trenches, the Worcesters attacking in four separate waves. Each man in the attacking force wore a small reflective metal panel on his back so the observing staff could track their progress. At first, the troops made good progress through the dust and smoke caused by the shelling. However, as the passed over the small ridge in front of the Turkish trenches, the came under massed machine gun fire from both flanks. The attacks by the 2nd Hampshire on the left and the 5th Manchesters on the right had been crushed by Turkish machine gun fire in an identical way. Some small number of Worcesters made it into the Turkish trenches where savage hand to hand fighting took place. Apart from a very small party, no foothold was gained in the Turkish position. Over 60 Worcesters were taken prisoner by the Turks in this attack.

As night fell the enormity of the failed attack began to be fully realized by headquarters. Wounded men crawled in to safety, and the few Worcesters who managed to hold ground in the Turkish trenches withdrew to comparative safety of their own line. At dawn on the 7th August, the 88th Brigade were relieved by the 86th Brigade, and returned to Gully Beach. 88th Brigade had suffered a loss of two thirds of its strength in 10 minutes on the 6th of August. It had lost 2000 officers and men as casualties out of a strength of 3000 . The 4th Worcesters had lost 16 officers and 752 NCOs and men.




with the dawn came
relief—the Fusilier battalions of the 86th Brigade. The remnant of the 4th Worcestershire went
back to Gully Beach, to reorganise and reckon their loss. It was found that the casualties numbered
.
That virtual destruction of the Battalion was a stunning wind after the high hopes before the
battle. The only consolation was that the very strength of the Turkish defence proved that from the

(a) All telephone lines were broken.
(6) Apparently about 60 of the Battalion were taken prisoners, including three officers, Captain Brett, Lieut. Stone
and Lieut. Entwhistle. The latter officer remained a prisoner until 1918, and was invaluable in cheering his
comrades in misfortune by his pluck and spirit. He was released at the Armistice, and all were saddened by
his death at Alexandria on the way home. (c) 42nd Divisional Diary.
(d) 2/Lient. S. W. Southwood ; who was afterwards awarded the M.C. (e) Nearly 300.
(/) The Battalion Diary was afterwards lost, so no complete list of these casualties is available, but they included
the following officers :—Killed : Captain F. Falcon, Capt. H. Field, Lieut. H. E. Voyce, Lieut. W. E. G.
Atkinson (D.C.L.I.). Wounded : Captain H. M. St. John, Lieut. W. G. J. Pearce, Lieut. A. W. H. Cook,
Lieut. M. Gordon. Missing : Capt. H. A Brett ? ftegt.), Captain E. M. W. Court, Lieuts. J. L.
Stone, F. H. Russell, A. L. Goldie and J. M. B. Entwhistle.
94

strategic point of view the object of the attack had been obtained; the enemy had concentrated
at Krithia to meet the attack, leaving the decisive attack further north a full chance of success.
Such was the gist of the speech of the Divisional Commander, General de Lisle, to the. survivors
of the Brigade ; and that news cheered them despite their heavy loss.

95
Researching the 75 men of the Great War Memorial of St Anne's Church, Bewdley, Worcestershire .
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Re: Men of Bewdley

Postby Simon_Fielding » Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:02 pm

Mike Jones wrote:
> Hello Simon, I am struggling badly with this new system and not sure where
> this reply will end up but here goes. My main interest is regimental
> numbers from around the time of World War 1, their link to a date of
> enlistment and which battalion a man ended up in. Some bits are clear,
> other bits are very foggy but I am working hard to clear the fog. Maybe we
> can swop some information. I have 4 data-bases on the go, which may be of
> some help to you. What I would like, if you have it are details of wether a
> man was a Regular, Reservist or on the Special Reserve. Any details of when
> a man enlisted and/or any thing else you think might clear the fog a bit.
> Many thanks Mike Jones

Found your old message Mike - if the offer's still valid, these are the 9th / 4th Bn Bewdley casualties. It sounds like you're way ahead of my data which is culled from ancestry and local papers!!

Simon

Millward Joseph Private 20705 19/12/1915 kia 9 Worcestershire Regiment Pieta Military Malta


Bishop William Private 12984 11/05/1915 kia 4 Worcestershire Regiment Helles Memorial Gallipoli Turkey
Payne William Henry Private 21327 19/06/1915 kia 4 Worcestershire Regiment Helles Memorial Gallipoli Turkey
Alberts John Private 20302 06/08/1915 kia 4 Worcestershire Regiment Helles Memorial Turkey
Researching the 75 men of the Great War Memorial of St Anne's Church, Bewdley, Worcestershire .
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Re: Pte Jabbitt 4th Btn Worcs. Regmnt. Dod 06.08.1915

Postby Simon_Fielding » Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:05 pm

Only from Stacke I'm afraid - see information on 6/8/15 elsewhere on this thread.

Simon

4th Battalion.
Jabbitt, Francis Charles, 20520, Pte., Gallipoli, 6/8/15

.ajabbitt wrote:
> Hi Simon,
>
> I have just stumbled across this fantastic website and discovered the fate
> of my great grandfather who died in the assault on Lone Pine, Gallipoili,
> 1915.
>
> I have also just seen your message re 4th Btn and would love to know if you
> have any record of a Pte Jabbitt (number 20520)?
>
> Many thanks in advance.
>
> Regards,
> Andrew
Researching the 75 men of the Great War Memorial of St Anne's Church, Bewdley, Worcestershire .
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Re:

Postby Simon_Fielding » Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:07 pm

hilsel wrote:
> Hello Simon, I hope you will receive this message, I am looking for any
> information on my Grandfather, Henry Mcdonald, who was with the 4th Bn,
> Worcestershire Regiment, Private no 21806, and died on 6 August, 1915 at
> Gallipoli. Regards Hilary

McDonald, Henry, 21806, Pte., Gallipoli, 6/8/15.

Only a basic mention I'm afraid - I hope you've seen the Stacke extract above.

Simon
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby Simon_Fielding » Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:12 pm

gallipolidigger wrote:
> hello simon,
> I need anykind of information about lance corporal John GANLEY who died in
> 27 sept. 1915 suvla/gallipoli....
> I appreciate any assistance ...thanx

Can't see any specific action during this period - suspect it was sniper activity.

Simon

Ganley, John, 12171, L/Cpl., Gallipot, 27/9/15.

At I.mbros the 4th Worcestershire passed a pleasant week in camp, resting as much as 4 T H
possible. Leisure, good food, and the absence of shells enabled all ranks to recover to some extent
from the strain of the fighting. Reinforcements also came in, including eleven new subalterns from
the Reserve Battalions (c) at Plymouth.
Embarking again on the evening of September 8th, the 4th Worcestershire were carried over
to Suvla, landed in the darkness and marched two miles in the teeth of a biting wind to a sheltered
position in a gully near the front line, where all ranks lay down to rest under waterproof sheets.

(a) Drafts for 9th Worcestershire—6th September 3 officers and 255 men. 8th September 3 officers and 208
men. 12th September 194 men. These are the Brigade figures ; the Battalion diary gives rather different
figures.
(6) Including being arrested as a spy by a nervous sentry of a Yeomanry regiment.
(c) A draft of six young subalterns from the 5th Battalion (2/Lieuts. A. L. Wills, L. A. W. Knight, M. Hurford-Jones,
H. Croom-Johnson, M. H. Meredith and J. M. P. Baird) had an eventful time in joining the Battalion. They
arrived at Suvla on September 5th, only to find that the Battalion had gone to Imbros. They were taken
off again in a rowing boat, which was compelled by rough seas to shelter under the lee of H.M.S. " Swiftsure."
There they had to remain while that battleship bombarded the Turkish positions; after which ear-splitting
experience they were transferred to a destroyer which eventually landed them at Imbros.
105

Next night the 88th Brigade relieved the 86th Brigade in trenches on the right of those previously
held. The 4th Worcestershire relieved the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers, and settled in to a long period
in the trenches.
Ten days later the 9th Worcestershire also came up into the front line. The 13th Division,
9 T H hitherto in reserve trenches by the Salt Lake, were now to relieve the 53rd Division in the centre of
the Corps front. On September 19th the relief began. Marching forward across the dry bed of
the Salt Lake the 9th Worcestershire took over the trenches round Sulajik Farm.
The new position of the 9th Worcestershire was little more than a mile south of that then
held by the 4th Battalion. Both formed part of the main line of defence which ran across the low
ground facing the Anafarta Hills. The ground was rough but fairly open, dotted with trees and
scrub which afforded good cover for snipers and patrols. The enemy, however, was anything but
active, and there were few encounters between the lines. Shell fire, however, was regularly kept
up, and the Turkish snipers were a constant danger.
The enemy's snipers indeed caused most of the loss. Incessant work was necessary to
make the long line of trenches reasonably safe and the officers (a) supervising the work were always
under fire. Perfect weather and a bright moon at night made easy the task of the Turkish
sharpshooters.
The 4th Battalion lost several officers in rapid succession, and as usual those thus lost were
among the best. On September 15th Lieutenant A. L. Wills was hit, on the 23rd. 2/Lieutenant
J. M. P. Baird was severely wounded, and on the 27th the Adjutant, Lieutenant H. James, V.C., was
put out of action by a wound in the foot (6). On the following night Captain F. E. Myddleton-Gavey
was shot dead.
The loss of Captain Myddleton-Gavey was a heavy wind. He was a most brave and competent
officer, and had just taken over command of the Battalion from, Major Winnington, whose
health had broken down. On hearing the news Major Winnington, although still physically unfit,
insisted on returning to duty, and carried on bravely until ordered back to hospital on the first
day of October. This was the last that the Regiment was to see of that gallant officer, who was
destined to fall later at the head of a battalion of another regiment in Palestine.
The command of the 4th Battalion then devolved on a subaltern, Lieut. H. Arnold. The
other surviving officers were all 2nd Lieutenants, who soon numbered some twenty in all (c)—a situation
probably unique in the annals of the Regiment. Regimental-Sergeant-Major C. Felix was a
tower of strength to the Battalion during that period, giving every aid to the inexperienced young
officers.
On the night of October 17th an incident occurred which proved that those young officers
had little to learn in the way of courage and devotion. The usual work was proceeding along the
trench line, and to protect the workers a small covering party had been sent forward. A burst
of fire from the front indicated that this party had been ambushed. A subaltern, 2/Lieut. G. W.
Mellor, went out to the spot and found that the N.C.O. and two men of the party had been hit.
He himself was wounded but managed to crawl back to the trench, as also did the rest of the covering
party. On hearing of the wounded men out in front, another newly-joined subaltern, 2/Lieut. D.
A. W. Greenway, went out with two of his men to bring them in. The wounded men were lying
on the far side- of our wire entanglements, which there formed three separate belts. The enemy were
keeping up a sharp fire. Stopping his men on the near side of the entanglements 2/Lieut. Greenway
crawled alone under the three belts of wire, reached the wounded men and dragged them back one at
a time. He brought two into safety and was just about to reach the third man when he was shot
dead. Dawn was then breaking and nothing more could be done. Next night, after a day of heavy
shell fire, the body of the brave subaltern was recovered. He had been with the Battalion exactly
a week.
A mile to the southward, the 9th Battalion was passing a very similar time. The energy
of Major Faviell and the restless enterprise of the young Adjutant, Captain Conybeare, were
responsible for many minor adventures. On the night of September 26th a working party under
(b)
(c)
a) During this period several officers joined or rejoined the 9th Worcestershire, notably Capts. A. N. C. Kittermaster,
P. Mac D. Sanderson and E. H. Hiscock, Lieut. C. E. Sladden and 2/Lieuts. C. J. Howell, R. C. Marshall,
C. W. F. Rawle and E. K. Myles.
2/Lieut. B. G. T. Hawkes took over the Adjutancy during the next fortnight.
More 2/Lieuts. joined in large numbers during October, as follows :—Oct. 4th J. E. Overbury. Oct. 7th G. P.
Brettell, L. A. Bruton, D. A. W. Green-way, C. S. Jagger, J. Powell, E. P. Thornton and G. W. Mellor. October
9th G. W. Field, L. L. Goold and K. Greenaway. On Oct. 10th 2/Lt. L. A. W. Knight took over the duties
of Quartermaster and 2/Lt. M. H. Meredith was appointed A/Adjt.
It was later reckoned that, up till October, the 4th Worcestershire had received 105 officers.
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby 31Cherry » Mon May 14, 2012 7:15 pm

I believe my grandfather, George Oliver, was in the Worcestershire 4th Bn at Gallipoli where he was wounded. If you come accross any information on where the wounded were taken I should be most grateful.
Janet Dunn
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby colb » Sun Nov 11, 2012 7:42 pm

Hi
I am trying to place my Great Uncle Pte 18582 Frederick Morris 4th Bn Worcesters who died 28 June 1915 at Gallipoli.
I have ascertained that his Bt arrived Cape Helles 25th April 1915. His name is on the Helles Point Memorial.
Also interested to know which cemetry he would have ended up in as I know movements and reinternments were made after the war.
Would be grateful if anyone comes across any of the information I am after.
Colb
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby Simon_Fielding » Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:17 pm

Name: Frederick Morris
Birth Place: Tewkesbury, Glos
Residence: Earl's Croome, Worcs
Death Date: 28 Jun 1915
Death Location: Gallipoli
Enlistment Location: Cleobury Mortimer, Salop
Rank: Private
Regiment: Worcestershire Regiment
Battalion: 4th Battalion
Number: 18582
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Balkan Theatre
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby Simon_Fielding » Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:24 pm

Listed as Frank on medal card and this confirms date of 25/4 as first entry into theatre...
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Re: Great War 1914-1918: 4th Bn Gallipoli

Postby colb » Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:25 pm

Thanks for the information Simon, knew most of that but didn't know where he enlisted so thats another bit of information gained.
I do have a copy of a letter he wrote to his parents as the bn left Leamington Spa for Avonmouth to board their troopship hope to scan it and transcribe it for the Regiment Site.

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